HPV Vaccination

 

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Since September 2008 there has been a national programme to vaccinate girls aged 12-13 against human papilloma virus (HPV).  There is also a three-year catch up campaign that will offer the HPV vaccine (also known as the cervical cancer jab) to 13-18 year old girls. 

The programme is delivered largely through secondary schools, and consists of three injections that are given over a six-month period. In the UK, more than 1.4 million doses have been given since the vaccination programme started.

 

Human papilloma virus (HPV)

Human papilloma virus (HPV) is the name of a family of viruses that affect the skin and the moist membranes that line your body, such as those in your cervix, anus, mouth and throat.

These membranes are called the mucosa. 

There are more than 100 different types of HPV viruses, with about 40 types affecting the genital area. These are classed as high risk and low risk. 

 

What HPV infection can do 

Infection with some types of HPV can cause abnormal tissue growth and other changes to cells, which can lead to cervical cancer. Infection with other forms of HPV can also cause genital warts. 

Other types of HPV infection can cause minor problems, such as common skin warts and verrucas. 

Around 30 types of HPV are transmitted through sexual contact, including those that can cause cervical cancer and genital warts. Genital warts are the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in the UK. 

HPV infection is also linked to vaginal cancer and vulval cancer, although both are rare conditions. 

 

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